Restoring Natural Systems & Creating Resilience

 

At long last, the threat of climate change has made the transition from an admitted risk to a top priority on the nation’s agenda. As the urgency and consensus around climate change and the resulting global warming grows, scientists and policymakers are seeking to develop and define the role of public land in combating climate change.

In the long term, climate change will cause a decrease in forest growth and as emissions increase, the changing climate will adversely affect the ability of forests to act as carbon stores. As the climate continues to warm, scientists predict potentially hotter and driers summers and larger and more intense fires and insect outbreaks. If prompt action is not taken, these forests could become carbon sources instead of carbon sinks, worsening a growing problem.

Our water is already showing signs of irreversible impact from climate change.  Oregon’s streams and rivers are warming and drying up; drought conditions put forests at risk of devastating fires; stream flows are lower than ever; and temperature-sensitive salmon species are stressed and have already started to die.  This is happening alarmingly fast.  We may lose more than half of the painstakingly-built Sockeye population, much of which mysteriously disappeared after going over the Bonneville Dam in 2015.

With proper management and scientific information, the nation’s public land can act as part of the solution to our growing climate change crisis. Under the Northwest Forest Plan, our federal land has already increased its carbon stores and the United States could and should be recognized for this effort in any international climate talks. Additional similar carbon reserves would increase our standing on the world stage. The best available science must guide us as we select the best policies to reduce carbon and tackle global warming.

In addition, Crag’s partners and clients are working to reduce the amount of coal and natural gas that passes through Oregon.  Our clients have undertaken several projects to protect their communities from coal and natural gas export facilities.

In addition to litigation, Crag assists partners and clients with other forms of nonprofit support as well as mediation, negotiation and conflict resolution.

See all Climate Change and Energy cases

Current Cases

Oregon Youth Ask Appellate Court to Protect Our Climate

Oregon Youth Ask Appellate Court to Protect Our Climate

Back in May 2011, youth from around the world filed lawsuits seeking remedies against state and federal governments for failing to take action to combat the climate crisis.  As part of this worldwide movement, Crag has been representing two young women here in Oregon...

Another Blow to Oregon LNG

Another Blow to Oregon LNG

Last week, a Hearings Officer in the City of Warrenton denied land use permits for Oregon LNG's natural gas terminal. Crag worked together with clients Columbia Riverkeeper and Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition to demonstrate the proposal's risks to the community...

Past Accomplishments

Oregon Youth Ask Appellate Court to Protect Our Climate

Oregon Youth Ask Appellate Court to Protect Our Climate

Back in May 2011, youth from around the world filed lawsuits seeking remedies against state and federal governments for failing to take action to combat the climate crisis.  As part of this worldwide movement, Crag has been representing two young women here in Oregon...

Jordan Cove LNG project DENIED!

Jordan Cove LNG project DENIED!

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has denied applications for Jordan Cove LNG and Pacific Connector Pipeline to construct and operate a major LNG export facility in Coos Bay and southwest Oregon. Crag has worked for years with client Oregon Shores...

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