Public Lands

photo courtesy of Amy Stuart

Protecting Public Lands

We, the public, own much of the land in Oregon, Washington, and Alaska.  Government agencies manage these lands for a variety of uses, and if properly cared for, these lands can continue to provide clean air and water, healthy habitat for native fish and wildlife, and abundant recreational opportunities.  To protect these wild lands for current and future generations, Crag launched the Public Lands Program in 2001.

What We’re Working On

Mt. Hood Wilderness Land Exchange

Mt. Hood Wilderness Land Exchange

Mt. Hood is home to pristine wilderness, beautiful alpine lakes, scenic landscapes, and the historic Timberline Lodge. Since 2001, Crag has fought to protect the North Side of the mountain from Mt. Hood Meadows’ misguided development proposal.

Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex

The Klamath Basin contains five National Wildlife Refuges established to protect fish, wildlife, and waterfowl habitat. Unfortunately, the refuges have been severely damaged and degraded from competing commercial agricultural uses over the last century.

Tongass National Forest Old-Growth Logging

Tongass National Forest Old-Growth Logging

The Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska, known as the “crown jewel” of the National  Forest System, is America’s largest and wildest national forest. Nearly 17 million acres in size, the Tongass is the largest intact temperate rainforest on Earth.

Ochoco National Forest OHV Trail System

Ochoco National Forest OHV Trail System

Ochoco National Forest reflects the tremendous value our public lands provide. Unfortunately, the Forest Service approved a 137-mile off-highway vehicle (“OHV”) trail system in the Ochoco National Forest located within the Ochoco Mountains in Central Oregon.

Up with Salmon, Down with Clearcuts

Up with Salmon, Down with Clearcuts

Clearcuts threaten commercial fishing families and coho salmon. “Stronger protections for streams to protect the coho, clean water and fishing-dependent jobs and communities is decades overdue.”

Keeping Mt. Hood Wild & Free

Keeping Mt. Hood Wild & Free

Working to keep the North side of Mt. Hood wild and free is no small feat. Crag has been working with local orchardists, the Oregon Nordic Club, climbing groups like the Mazamas, conservation organizations and recreational clubs for nearly 17 years and we are not letting up…

Climate, Forests and the Eagle Creek Fire

Climate, Forests and the Eagle Creek Fire

The Eagle Creek fire burned through the Columbia River Gorge this summer, and clouded our skies with smoke. As the fire was burning, Congressman Greg Walden proposed to open the Scenic Area to logging. Expert scientists tell us the forest will recover best on its own. After the smoke cleared, we visited with local communities and made a film about the fire’s and to learn about forest recovery….

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